Cover of: Technology for justice | Dory Reiling

Technology for justice

how information technology can support judicial reform
  • 310 Pages
  • 0.49 MB
  • 3575 Downloads
  • English
by
Leiden University Press , [Amsterdam]
Technology and law, Court administration, Administration of Justice, Autom
StatementDory Reiling
SeriesLaw, governance, and development. Dissertations, Law, governance, and development
Classifications
LC ClassificationsK2110 .R45 2009
The Physical Object
Pagination310 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25017069M
ISBN 109087280718, 904851164X
ISBN 139789087280710, 9789048511648
LC Control Number2010420443
OCLC/WorldCa489215077

Most authors of books and articles on court technology focus on court administration and management. Technology is supposed to lower costs and make courts more efficient. Dory Reiling takes a very different perspective, asking instead how technology can reduce delay, improve access and improve by: In six magnificent essays, George Grant reflects on the extent to which technology has shaped the way we live now.

Admirers of Grant's English-Speaking Justice will welcome this exploration of the fate of traditional values in modern education, social behaviour, and religion, as well as Grant's penetrating insights into the technology of birth.4/5.

Technology for Justice examines impacts of information technology (IT) on the administration of justice. Court users all over the world complain mainly about long delays, lack of access to justice and court corruption.

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Drawing on a broad variety of sources - comparative studies, statistics, case law and jurisprudence, studies on IT use and on court usage - this study examines how IT can help. technology for justice how information technology can support judicial reform dory reiling.

Technology for Justice into this book was so lengthy, there are so many of them. If you recog-nize your own contribution in this book, please feel included in these acknowledgements.

In this book, for the first time, the 'question of technology' and its relation to criminal justice is approached as a whole. Technology, Crime and Justice analyzes a range of technologies, (including information, communications, nuclear, biological, transport and weapons technologies, amongst many others) in order to pose three interrelated Cited by: Information Technology and the Criminal Justice System suggests that information technology in criminal justice will continue to challenge us to think about how we turn information into knowledge, who can use that knowledge, and for what purposes.

In this text, editor April Pattavina synthesizes the growing body of research in information technology and criminal justice. Thus the use of DNA technology will involve tough trade-offs between individual and societal interests. This book, written by a distinguished group of authors including U.S.

Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer, explores the ethical, procedural, and economic challenges posed by the use of DNA evidence as well as future directions for the Reviews: 1. Tech For Justice® is an initiative to accelerate the development of technology applications and processes that improve access to justice in human rights, legal aid, and the environment.

We aim to support those who need critical help more efficiently, and change processes that no longer serve the people. We have seen the potential of DNA Technology for justice book demonstrate the fallibility of the criminal justice system. At the request of Attorney General Reno, the National Institute of Justice recently published a book describing 28 Technology for justice book in which DNA results were used to exonerate.

Technology and data are not separate from most of our social justice fights; they’re woven throughout them. The key is to give them the right amount of emphasis in our work. As the researcher and author Ursula Franklin said, “There is no technology for justice.

There is only justice.”. "Technology for Justice examines the impact of IT on the administration of justice. Drawing on a broad variety of sources such as comparative studies, statistics, case law and legal studies on the use of IT in court, Reiling examines how IT can help remedy judicial delays, lack of access to justice.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle coronavirus.

Technology for Justice by Dory Reiling,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide. As can be seen on the "ESAS©® Results" page, this cutting-edge technology saved Florida taxpayers over a million dollars in state prison costs on the first five cases on which it was deployed.

For additional information and/or how you can access this web-based electronic research tool that’s revolutionizing criminal justice with equitable. Any person who is working for social justice in the world of technology would benefit from reading this book. Jane Margolis. Institute for Democracy, Education, and Access, UCLA's Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, and author, Stuck in the.

Information Technology and the Criminal Justice System suggests that information technology in criminal justice will continue to challenge us to think about how we turn information into knowledge, who can use that knowledge, and for what purposes. Law Technology Now host Ralph Baxter sits down with Professor Richard Susskind OBE, one of the foremost experts and advocates for the implementation of technology with legal services delivery.

They discuss Richard’s latest book, Online Courts and the Future of Justice, the limited or nonexistent access to justice problem for most of the world, and how the adoption of AI and.

Criminal Justice Research Methods: Theory and Practice By Gerald J. Bayens; Cliff Roberson CRC Press, (2nd edition) Read preview Overview Criminal Behavior By Elaine Cassel; Douglas A.

Bernstein Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, (2nd edition).

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How is technology changing our daily lives. And how may we change it for the better. Three recent books provide fascinating answers to these questions. Charlton McIlwain’s Black Software: The Internet & Racial Justice, From the AfroNet to Black Lives Matter, offers a compelling history and theory of how many forms of bias and subordination degraded online life, [ ].

This book offers the first comprehensive and holistic overview of global research on technology, crime and justice. It is divided into five parts, each corresponding with the key stages of the offending and justice process: Part I addresses the current conceptual understanding of technology within academia and the criminal justice system.

Information Technology and the Criminal Justice System suggests that information technology in criminal justice will continue to challenge us to think about how we turn information into knowledge, who can use that knowledge, and for what purposes.

In this text, editor April Pattavina synthesizes the growing body of research in information. In this book, for the first time, the 'question of technology' and its relation to criminal justice is approached as a whole. Technology, Crime and Justice analyzes a range of technologies, (including information, communications, nuclear, biological, transport and weapons technologies, amongst many others) in order to pose three interrelated.

The LEGALTECH Book is the first crowdsourced book on legal technologies and innovations focused on the financial services sector. It brings together top entrepreneurs, lawyers, investors and LegalTech experts, who exclusively share their visions and unique insights on the nature of legal technologies and their relationship with data, Internet of Things (IoT), artificial intelligence.

Technology for Justice How Information Technology can support Judicial Reform. Leiden University Press and Amsterdam University Press Law, Governance and Development Dissertation Series isbn 15,6 x 23,4 cm, pages, paperback, English € 39,90 now also available from The PhD ceremony.

The answer is to use technology and procedural innovation to simplify and change the process itself. In the civil and criminal courts where ordinary Americans appear the most, we should streamline complex procedures and assume that parties will not have a lawyer, rather than the other way around.

“Rebooting Justice is a crucial book on a. The new book — “Design Justice: Community Led Practices to Build the Worlds We Need,” published by the MIT Press — looks broadly at such shortcomings and offers a framework for fixing them while lifting up methods of technology design that.

Some sections of the book deal with topics familiar to students of capital punishment, albeit in a non-traditional way. Wills reviews some major Supreme Court decisions and the (futile) efforts of the justices to make the modern death penalty compatible with the.

The book “shows us what real alternatives to overpolicing would look like and how reducing the overall size and power of the police force can. In pursuit of public safety, the application of information technology (IT) 1 to criminal justice applications has many potential benefits.

Improved availability and use of information can increase the efficiency of police operations, resulting in more effective crime control at lower cost or reduced risk to law enforcement officers.

Description Technology for justice PDF

Working from pre-internet concepts of social and distributive justice, editors Rooksby and Weckert present 13 chapters exploring the digital divide," explained as the potential disadvantages faced by populatons who lack access and training to new information and communications technologies." – Book News Inc., August.

Technology, especially computer and communications technology, has become so pervasive and powerful that we cannot afford to ignore the way it shapes our communal life. Therefore, in addition to the rights and protections due individuals, we need to look seriously at issues of justice and other civic virtues.Criminal Justice; Rochester’s Police Chief Resigns as Quest for #JusticeforDaniel Continues.

Our campaign seeking justice for Daniel Prude, a year-old Black man in need of mental health help who was killed by cops in March is gathering steam.

Rochester’s police chief and deputy police chief both resigned after body camera footage was released showing what we all knew: Daniel should be. But there’s another emerging technology that might not be so good for the justice system: video visitation. Many courts have moved to videoconferencing technology so that they can hold brief hearings with jail inmates without requiring jail staff to undergo the time-consuming and risky process of transporting inmates to court.